Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology

Stem Cell Biology, Single Cell Mass Spectometry, Mass Spectrometry of protein complexes

Drs. Nolan, Blau, Jackson

The Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Laboratory was created at Stanford University School of Medicine in January 2002. Helen M. Blau, Ph.D., of the department of Microbiology and Immunology and and the Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Professor of Stem Cell Biology is the first director of the Baxter Laboratory. The Laboratory has been made possible by an endowment provided to the school of medicine by the Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation. The opening of the Baxter Laboratory was celebrated in May 2002.

The faculty of the Baxter Laboratory are Professors Helen M. Blau, Ph.D., Garry P. Nolan, Ph.D., and Peter Jackson, Ph.D.

Events & achievements

What Baxter Laboratory is About

The founding principles of the Baxter Laboratory are to bring together bioscientists who are interested not only in the basic mechanisms of disease processes, but also in exploiting biological systems to more directly bring about cures for important diseases. The laboratory also seeks to bring together researchers interested in similar diseases in a collaborative fashion.

Located on the top floor of the Sir Norman Foster designed Center for Clinical Sciences Research laboratory building at the School of Medicine, and adjacent to the Beckman Center for Molecular and Genetic Medicine, the laboratory uses innovative cellular, genetic, and pharmacological approaches for novel drug design and delivery in order to enhance cellular repair processes.

Research is conducted in the specific areas of blood vessel growth relevant to treatment of cardiac disease and cancer, HIV, autoimmune disease, adult stem cells, and genetic engineering. One focus is the genetic networks controlled by reguatory RNAs and the roles that these RNAs play in modulating the development, function and pathogenesis of vertebrate immune systems. Many of the approaches focus on enlisting the body to fight its own diseases - one recent example is the finding that cells from adult bone marrow can be recruited to rescue damaged tissues, such as adult brain cells which may be injured by stroke, Parkinson's disease, or by trauma to the head. 

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